WPA Artist:
Find Members
Member Login


Remember Me
Password Reminder

Finding a Gallery that Fits: The Artist's Search for Gallery Representation


In my studio,  I usually think in terms of  mini-narratives and metaphors. The formal elements come later, after I begin to work on an image.Leaving specific information out helps make the images more open to the viewer. The finished image may not have the same associations or meanings for viewers, but it might.

Recently I've been venturing into Textille Art, using print processes on cotton rather than paper. This has been really fun, I'm interested to see how far I can go with it--
Birdwell, Donna
Gratovich, Annalise
I create abstract woodblock prints to investigate and respond to the visual, tactile, and experiential world. I make these works by carving marks into wood that is then rolled with ink. The inked impression is transferred to paper by rubbing with a wooden spoon. Each layer of color builds a surface that is both planned and accidental. Printing and carving occur in stages—I cut back into the same blocks over and over again through time. In this way, as the print is created, the blocks are destroyed. I view the process of relief printmaking as a metaphor exposing the gaps between the physical, the imagined, and what we perceive as the "seen” reality.

My imagery resides in this gap between visual impressions and the conjuring of names or descriptions. This gap is what separates the familiar from the unknown and is where I try to situate each work. I juxtapose the sensual and visceral against the spiritual and symbolic and create realms where the sacred and profane exist in tandem. To accomplish this, I obfuscate, deconstruct, reassemble, and transform visuals culled from my perceptions of both organic and man-made environments, dreams, memories, and learned or imagined myths.

I aim to discover images that deliberately set on edge the associations we bring to forms. In other words, I use forms that might mean many things, have several names, or be both whimsical and terribly dark at the same time. Since the process of constructing narratives is fluid, active, and personal, each viewer completes the work, bringing his or her own associations to bear in how to decipher each piece. It is in this open space—this stream of ever-changing perceptions, before mental categorization and verbal assignments—where we discover how to bridge what we see with what we know.

My work is a constant search of knowledge, both personal and external. I concentrate on the consideration of life, time and space. My work synthesizes mythology and reality into dynamic environments in which spaces expand and contract unexpectedly. Using energetic patterns and lines, I create planes intertwined with people and animals creating an exuberant narrative. Recently I extended my interest into natural motifs in a series of mountain and forest landscapes, in which a principle moment appears frozen. Challenging the notions of time and sequence, in which the viewer completes the narrative.

I create dreamy, layered landscapes that evoke the history and memory of place. My recent work is based on travels in the Middle East, where competing historical narratives and cultural memories shape modern life. These works portray a shared landscape, repeatedly divided, and the beauty of a land we only hear about in terms of blood shed. Beneath the divisions of religion, culture or nationality we construct, lies the common human experience.

I'm fascinated with the printmaking process, especially the delightful surprises that come the first time a new plate is pulled. I gravitate towards the textural effects of collagraphs finding platemaking is only limited by one’s imagination. My work has been exhibited throughout the US but primarily in Texas, with a second solo show on the books for Chicago in 2015.
Swanson, Anneke
Winkles, Amanda
Workshop Details
WHEN:
4/28/2012
WHERE:
Cheryl's House
CONTACTS:
Chair: Ashley Salinas
Participate
Event Deadline
The deadline for this event (4/11/2012) has passed.