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2010 Gelatin Prints - Anna Kinbar

The natural world is my muse. The complex process of printmaking – from the selection of plate surface to the choice of inks – is inspired by the subject matter. The concerns of our environment, man’s impact on his surroundings, and the future of the planet influence my subject choices.  There is beauty in small moments; my goal is to capture the essence of those moments.

I print at Slugfest in East Austin. You can see more of my work by visiting www.tbondartist.com

       Lately when I create art it is about getting out of my own head. Letting go of control over the world and planning every minute. It is a kind of meditation that allows my emotions to spill onto the page without being filtered, judged, and edited. I try to let my subconscious direct the process. I like to use organic materials I collect from my yard and on walks. I also use cut paper and found objects in my work. I love that what is essentially a weed can turn into something beautiful on the page and it has given me a new way of looking at the world around me. I have found that art helps me to be more intuitive, creative, and relaxed in all aspects of my life.

My work celebrates the spirit of the people and places I have encountered. Whether this is represented through color, choice of line carved, etched, molded, drawn or painted through the conscious use of mark making via time honored traditions of printmaking techniques, I am interested in honoring the subject. So much is required in developing an image; it serves as a meditative device. The push and pull during the creation process is part intuitive, reactionary, and peace maker.
I find myself combining the past and present on a routine basis in my work. How may I provide the viewer with a snapshot that encapsulates people, place, time? How may I engage the visceral response of the audience? The stories I have been witness to, the beauty I have encountered and the decay of the previously celebrated: all find a home in my heart and art. My work has been described as"visual haiku.

I was living in New Mexico when a fortuitous requirement of printmaking coursework for my graduate program in art therapy led me to expression in another medium. Since that time I have been exploring printmaking and creating soft ethereal-like inspirational images. The circle or circular movement can often be seen in my artwork. The circle is a universal symbol with extensive meaning--a continuous symbol that has no beginning and no end. Throughout my life I have created circles, benefiting from the sense of comfort, peace, and total integration.

How I feel when I am making art is perfectly described in what Don Miguel Ruiz says: "When you are in your creation and you are doing what you love to do, you become what you really are again. You are not thinking in that moment; you are expressing.” I love being in that space where I am not really thinking, I am expressing what I am feeling inside. One could say that I make art to please the eye and touch the soul.

My current body of work is based on diseased tissue of the heart, lung and liver tissues. I use this imagery to explore the negative and positive aspects of mutation at a cellular lever, and how it is both destructive and innovative. I break the imagery down into simple, formal, fundamental shapes to create cellular elements which become the tools of my drawing practice. With the development of electron microscopy, I imagine to possess the same filter when choosing the color and composition of my prints. I attach lighting elements to create the experience of looking though a microscope and to add life to the produced tissue samples. Depending on what emotion I want to represent, the imagery will either be a simple composition to emphasize the basic organic growth of life or a very chaotic scene to display stress and tension. I use repetition to give an identity to the cells and the importance of each one's placement.

I enjoy creating art from life. I feel that we are the sum of our experiences and that each moment is an opportunity to become something more. I think we should cherish the mundane, the every day, and the daily routines as they are the root of our personality, the fundamental base of who we are, and which contain the most comfortable moments of our lives.
 
Aside from subject matter I like to blur the border of media. I felt I had reached a peak in my drypoint line drawings. I have always been drawn to charcoal; the softness of the tone; the fragility of the medium. At any moment the marks could be blown or rubbed off the paper. I felt it would be a great achievement to create a reproducible print which captured the very essence of charcoal. Working with hand tools only using roulettes, sandpaper, a drypoint needle, and a scraper/burnisher I have successfully achieved my goal and feel that I have much more to learn.
Workshop Details
WHEN:
3/20/2010 - 3/21/2010
WHERE:
WPA Studio (1109 B Shady Lane - Studio 8)
CONTACTS:
Chair: Anna Kinbar
Participate
Event Deadline
The deadline for this event (3/15/2010) has passed.