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I was diagnosed with talent at an early age, and was always the artist of the family. I was proud of my draftsmanship, but as time went by, I realized that I couldn't take credit for my talent; it was a gift. What I do take credit for is the effort I have made through the years to master my craft, those areas of printmaking that I focus on: mezzotint, etching and linoleum. My preferred subject is the human face and figure.  I am fascinated by faces, and in trying to capture them I increase my understanding of what it means to be human.

The natural world is my muse. The complex process of printmaking – from the selection of plate surface to the choice of inks – is inspired by the subject matter. The concerns of our environment, man’s impact on his surroundings, and the future of the planet influence my subject choices.  There is beauty in small moments; my goal is to capture the essence of those moments.

I print at Slugfest in East Austin. You can see more of my work by visiting www.tbondartist.com

My art is developed from a narrative fragmenting of images. My childhood was rich with colorful characters, steel magnolias and a confluence of mixed messages. The consequence of this is a creative ability to find humor in most things. My aesthetics reflect these poetic dichotomies: beauty with calculation, the bitter with the sweet, the humorous with the serious; the literary with the familiar; clandestine moments with collected observations. I enjoy the play of metamorphic connections with the subconscious and senses. Sexual entendre and duality of meanings are explored with symbolic and psychological innuendo. Images are juxtaposed, altered, and accessoried with a tongue-in-cheek attitude to form the focus of my work.
I strive for Magritte's basic intention, to make art with a "disturbing poetic effect."ť My work presents exotic subjects in the drama of black and white, or the subtle monochromatic tones of printers' inks. The prints are based on my photos of real places and slightly mysterious objects that are embraced by a post-apocalyptic anxiety, which induces a state of psychological unease in the viewer. The images raise questions, but knowing the back story doesn't necessarily provide comfort. The result is by turns intimate, earthy, fragile, universal, and contemporary. The images are full of the organic subtlety showing the naked beauty of weathered rock and plants, contrasted with man-made architectural elements. The organic elements complement the man-made. In purely aesthetic terms, the works use an interplay of tones and textures, with formal qualities of composition in the arrangements of objects under the viewer's gaze. The unfamiliar induces a state of ambiguity mixed with a strange longing or nostalgia. The camera captures temporal events, figurative and narrative, fragments in the cycle of life and death. History is revealed in multiple layers with an underlying order and inherent drama exposed in contrast and detail, painterly and sculptural at the same time.

I was living in New Mexico when a fortuitous requirement of printmaking coursework for my graduate program in art therapy led me to expression in another medium. Since that time I have been exploring printmaking and creating soft ethereal-like inspirational images. The circle or circular movement can often be seen in my artwork. The circle is a universal symbol with extensive meaning--a continuous symbol that has no beginning and no end. Throughout my life I have created circles, benefiting from the sense of comfort, peace, and total integration.

How I feel when I am making art is perfectly described in what Don Miguel Ruiz says: "When you are in your creation and you are doing what you love to do, you become what you really are again. You are not thinking in that moment; you are expressing.” I love being in that space where I am not really thinking, I am expressing what I am feeling inside. One could say that I make art to please the eye and touch the soul.

My primary mediums are drawing and printmaking. Monotype methods afford me the pleasure of not only drawing, but also the spontaneity of image-making that I enjoy. When I am printing, the process defines my steps - one thing flows into another as I manipulate the ink and make runs through the press. The laying down of ink and then printing or drawing directly on the plate is something that never gets old for me. My work can be compilations of prints that have been cut and re-assembled to become part of something new. Often they are created by drawing directly onto paper placed on an inked plate.

I compare the collage aspect of my work to the push/pull of the painter's brush across a canvas by introducing, removing and re-introducing elements as the work progresses. Printed textures and found objects serve to unify the surface.

My inspiration is rooted in images I find in old family photographs. I use what is often an unknown story and insert a story of my own.


Memory, location and nature, the inspirations 
Texture and pattern, the fascination
Printmaking, the adventure.
The dance of the brush, the roll of the brayer, the work in progress;  soul satisfying!


Left Bank is a tribute to the Pictorialist photographers of the early 20th century whose images and techniques were considered groundbreaking for their time and whose work revolutionized the way the world viewed photography as an art form.

These photographers often focused their lenses on significant artistic figures of their day and, like them, I am creating portraits of artists, dancers, writers, musicians and others whose work inspires me, depicting them as they might have appeared during that time. These images, captured on film, are made using the same lighting techniques, materials and traditional processes employed throughout this era.

I currently create nature-related abstract prints. The line work images represent a small part of a natural being, such as an insect. As I work to create these images, I abstract them as I am sketching before I begin cutting my plates.

I also have created a series of prints based on imagery in an old book about geography: Map, Mail Stops, Contour, and Flight Path

And, I occasionally create a representational print such as Medium Brew, for the 2016 WPA Trade.

I have a fascination with nature and I love collecting seeds, bones, and oddities I find in the streets. These often inspire ideas along with images I dream. The evolution of those ideas through drawing and the solar intaglio printmaking process is challenging but exciting. Imagination plays a big part in the formation of images and I find it satisfying when it all comes together.
I am an artist with a background in graphic design, painting, drawing and photography.  I am interested in exploring various ways of printing without a press.  I have played with monotypes, cyanotypes, rust prints, eco-prints and my own original stencils.  Currently I am experimenting with a Silhouette mint machine to make printing plates from my photographs.  I then create a relief print on watercolor paper and hand color them with watercolor paints.

An interest in Japanese Ukiyo-e and German Expressionist woodcuts started my fascination with printmaking. It was my major at UT Austin, where I also learned silkscreen, lithography, and etching. The variety of printmaking techniques allows infinite possibilities for creating imagery. Currently I am focusing on linocuts and plexiglass engravings with monoprinting. I enjoy making multiples and find it a great method for sharing artworks with others.
I have created visual art all my life and my work has been a reflection of my surroundings, ongoing circumstances, memories, emotions and imagination. Most of my artwork includes women because that's how I've experienced life. Encircling movements occur often, a reflection of universal natural currents, the continuous flow of ideas, communication, and time.

Amanda Cavazos Weems is an artist living in Austin, TX whose paintings focus on exploring the tactile qualities of paint and pushes against limitation of forms that can be created with liquid media. Her paintings inform her printmaking practice, and her two bodies of work explore texture, undulating organic forms, and depth.

Amanda attended the University of North Texas, and received a Bachelor's degree in Visual Art Studies. Amanda's work has been featured in the West Austin Studio Tour.

Exhibition Details
WHEN:
10/15/2016 - 11/18/2016
WHERE:
Scanlan Gallery at St Stephen's
CONTACTS:
Chair: Veronica J Ceci
Participate
Event Deadline
The deadline for this event (9/23/2016) has passed.